A sweded argument

Watched the delightful Be Kind Rewind instead of working and then typed “sweded” into the YouTube search engine. Do it sometime.

The movie, to me, kind of underscores an interesting debate about the rise of the do-it-yourselfers vs. the proud (and quality) professionals.

Anyone can shoot, produce, and distribute (or copy, upload and distribute) content making YouTube a viable alternative to mainstream media. This “democratizes” entertainment in that anyone can produce and view content for as many (or as few) who want to view it. In other words, the many can produce a wide amount of content for the few.

In this model, society is no longer beholden to “professional” experts, who produce a narrow amount of content for as wide an audience as possible (in order to achieve a proper financial return).

This “democracy” model also, according to such books as The Cult of the Amateur, by Andrew Keen, works against society. Professionals are professionals; they are trained to do their craft at a higher level than amateur counterparts. If the audience regularly turns to amateur-produced media, professionals can either adapt (which may compromise their training and their ability to produce “quality” content) or get edged out (in which case, society loses the quality altogether).

It’s kind of an interesting argument. You can look at the demise of newspapers (we won’t know what we’re missing when they’re gone …), or the demise of film and music criticism as examples. And while you may not immediately miss newspapers or film or music criticism, they are just the initial casualties on a war that could threaten to change (undo?) entertainment as we know it

I don’t know about all that. I do know, however, that the sweded version of Batman is pretty darn funny. But I wouldn’t pay to watch it.

Advertisements

One thought on “A sweded argument

  1. I don’t know about argument for sweded films, but this reinforces my argument that ANYone could have played Ledger’s joker.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s